Hosting a Write-In Successfully During NaNoWriMo

Hosting a write-in successfully during nanowrimo via KLWightman.com
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Interested in hosting a Write-In this year during NaNoWriMo? Write-Ins are a great way to meet writers in your community and provide a safe space for everyone to reach their word count goals during National Novel Writing Month.

That being said, there’s a lot of planning that goes behind this event. If you want to host a Write-In during NaNoWriMo, follow these steps so that your event is successful.

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How to Take Chances with Your Writing

How to Take Chance with Your Writing via KLWightman.com
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If you’re like me, you hesitate to take chances with your writing. What if it screws everything up? What if it goes nowhere? What if it’s a waste of time?

The most triumphant of tales follow a specific story arc that we as writers must replicate in order to be successful in writing our own books. Yet the most memorable of stories are those that take chances, ones that do something so different enough that it stands out as genius among a sea of shelves stocked with hardcover novels.

But how do we get there?

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Summer Writing Camps for Adults: 2019 Edition

Summer Writing Camps for Adults 2019 Edition via KLWightman.com
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For years, I wondered why only kids get the chance to run away from all their problems and express their creativity through the ritual we call summer writing camp. This is something adults want too!

Thanks to you, I know I’m not alone. I wrote this blog post last year to see if it was only me that wanted a seasonal escape. Turns out, hundreds of you also want to spend a week of your summer somewhere full of adventure where your creative writing can run wild.

So the tradition of this list continues.

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How to Add More Scare into Your Story

How to Add More Scare Into Your Story via KLWightman.com
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True fear is hard to convey, especially when writing a scary story. Sure, you can state that your character feels fearful, but fear is an art form better shown than told. And merely repeating the words “fear” and “dread” and “horror” and “panic” and “fright” and “alarm” and “scare” isn’t going to cut it.

You could go with the classics of rattling chains, splattering of blood and tormented groans. But that’s all been done before.

What you want is to chill your readers to the core. You want to see goosebumps. You want to haunt their nightmares.

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