Should We Make an Appointment to Write?

Should We Make an Appointment to Write?
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Two days ago was my self-proclaimed Treat Yourself Day. I had it all planned out:

  • 9AM: Order a chai bomb at a new coffee shop and write a blog post
  • 11AM: Enjoy a full-body massage with my spa gift certificate
  • 12PM: Order a glass of wine at lunch
  • 1PM: Go shopping!
  • 5PM: Make (vegetarian) paella for dinner and watch a movie
Spa candles and towels

Credit: DeltaHotels.com

Most of the day went as planned. Except for the 9AM part. I pressed snooze so many times on my alarm clock that by the time I was up and ready to go for the day, I didn’t have enough time for that chai bomb or that blog post.

So I read a book instead before the massage. Not a bad alternative.

But I didn’t miss my massage appointment. And I was actually looking forward to my coffee shop time more than the spa experience.

So why did I make sure that I didn’t miss the massage? Because I had an appointment.

Our society holds appointments in high regard. We work hard at not missing them. We schedule them in advance. We feel guilty for pushing them back or cancelling.

But what about writing?

We often plan to write when it’s convenient in our schedule. We easily push it to the side when something somewhat important arises. We press snooze on our writing opportunities so much that we sleep through our chance to write.

Lightbulb

So then I had an epiphany: Why don’t we make writing appointments for ourselves?

We schedule a time in our calendars. We set reminders hours and days before it’s time to get the ball rolling. We have our writing equipment ready to go the night before—just like we do for an appointment.

 

The most important part: We need to reserve a room somewhere.

If we can’t hold ourselves accountable so that we make time to write, then we need to treat our writing time like an appointment.

Call to schedule a room (appointment) at your library or rent a small conference room at your local co-working space. Better yet, make it a weekly appointment so that you’re writing regularly.

The beauty of writing is that we can write at anytime and at anyplace. But if we’re not creating anything, then there’s no beauty nor writing.

Co-Working Space

Credit: workantile.com

Don’t worry, I’m not just talking the talk. I’ve looked into my local options and was surprised at the results. I can purchase a day pass at a nearby co-working space for $35 (with group lunches every Wednesday!). And my local library branch has free study rooms (although they’re first-come, first serve).

Once we are in the habit of making an appointment for our writing, then we can make our writing habit happen anywhere (and eventually at anytime). An appointment is the start of your writing time becoming a healthy habit.

Do you often skip out on your writing time? Share your experience below.

Why We Don’t Read Anymore

Why We Don’t Read Anymore
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I set aside an hour before I fall asleep at night to read at least one chapter from a novel or non-fiction book. Sometimes I’ll even switch it up with a story from a magazine.

But the standard still stands: I must read every day.

My family teases me constantly about my reading habits. They think it’s funny (and often annoying) that I get antsy when holidays or last-minute plans throw off my nightly ritual.

Perfume spraying

Credit: inmagine.com

It (usually) isn’t my eagerness to get back to the story. It’s because I know how easy it is to fall out of pattern with reading.

It’s not that I hate reading. Quite the opposite. I love to read. I mark library used book sales on my calendar. I visit bookstores for fun—and for hours.

And does eau de aged paper exist? (Answer: Yes)

Yet it’s still easy for me to fall out of touch with reading, someone who has dedicated an entire career to writing words.

Cat gasping GIF

And I’m not the only one that feels this way. In fact, 27 percent of adults haven’t read a single book in the last year.

That’s right. 1 in 4 people didn’t pick up a book for the entire year.

So why is it so hard for us to read?

 

 

Is It Because We’re Busy?

Television GIF

If that’s what you want to believe. You don’t have time to pick up a book and read a few pages because you have to work, do errands and fulfill family or community commitments.

But let me ask you this: How much TV have you watched this week? How much time have you spent online?

That’s what I thought. You do have time. You’re just spending that extra time on something else.

Are We Choosing the Wrong Books to Read?

Book page turning GIF

I’ve fallen in that trap. I’ve started a book that I can’t stand and reading starts to feel like a homework assignment. Yet I find myself finishing it with no problem.

And I’ve found myself in love with a book—but never finding myself reading it.

If you’re not reading because you don’t like your current read, then pick up something else. The real problem is that you’re not picking up any book at all.

Why We’re Really Not Reading

We don’t read anymore because we don’t make it a priority. We don’t value reading enough to make it part of our daily lives.

Books GIF

I have a hard time fitting in exercise into my schedule, yet I don’t quit running because it’s hard to make time for. I wake up an hour earlier so that I can make it happen.

If you love reading as much as you say you do—yet you’re not reading regularly—then you don’t love reading. It’s just that simple.

If you love reading, then make room for it in your day. Look at your schedule and plan where you can dedicate 30 minutes or an hour to reading a good book.

Because how often do you look back at yesterday and regret reading?

Why are you not reading? Share your story below.